Meeting the needs of individuals who are interested in promoting excellence, innovation, and change in continuing education initiatives for health professionals.

Leading and Influencing Change in CPD is a certificate program designed to meet the needs of individuals who are interested in promoting excellence, innovation, and change in continuing education initiatives for health professionals. This program specifically aims to provide the participants with a broad range of valuable management and leadership skills and the tools necessary to lead continuing education initiatives for health professionals in today’s complex health care environment.

By the end of the program, we expect that participants will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss how the demands and forces of change in the health care environment have created opportunities and challenges to continuing health education providers;
  • Apply innovation principles and change process to lead, implement new initiatives and overcome barriers to change;
  • Foster collaboration with a diversity of stakeholders in continuing health education to enable success;
  • Lead and promote innovation in continuing health education for Health professionals.

Who Can Benefit?

Individuals who are:

  • engaged in continuing health education, knowledge translation, patient safety, quality improvement, performance improvement initiatives or health policy;
  • considering career advancement within CPD;
  • interested in promoting excellence, innovation, change, and scholarship in continuing education initiatives for health professionals.

Program Highlights

Key Areas

  • Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Learning Principles and Theories
  • Best Practices in Design and Delivery (including simulation with e-technology and IPE)
  • CPD in Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, Knowledge Translation
  • Partnerships and Collaborations across Sectors
  • Leadership
  • Managing CPD Programs and Offices

Learning Formats include

  • Keynote presentations
  • Small group workshops
  • Interactive exercises
  • Case based learning
  • Mentor groups
  • Personal projects

Testimonials

Good faculty, very knowledgeable/ practical/interact with the audience.
2010 CELP Program Attendee

All excellent, credible, very interactive, open to questions (faculty).
2010 CELP Program Attendee

Very practical concepts that can be put into practice
2010 CELP Program Attendee

Accreditation

Continuing Professional Development (CPD), Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Continuing Medical Education (CACME), a subcommittee of the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS). This standard allows CPD to review and assess educational activities based on the criteria established by The College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

As a result of a reciprocal agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, The American Medical Association, and The European Union for Medical Specialties (EUMS), CPD is permitted to assign respective credits.

Faculty Disclosure

It is the policy of University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Continuing Professional Development to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all its individually accredited or jointly accredited educational programs. Speakers and/or planning committee members, participating in University of Toronto accredited programs, are expected to disclose to the program audience any real or apparent conflict(s) of interest that may have a direct bearing on the subject matter of the continuing education program. This pertains to relationships within the last FIVE (5) years with pharmaceutical companies, biomedical device manufacturers, or other corporations whose products or services are related to the subject matter of the presentation topic. The intent of this policy is not to prevent a speaker with a potential conflict of interest from making a presentation. It is merely intended that any potential conflict should be identified openly so that the listeners may form their own judgments about the presentation with the full disclosure of facts. It remains for the audience to determine whether the speaker's outside interests may reflect a possible bias in either the exposition or the conclusions presented.